Lady Darwin
17 May 2012 @ 10:02 PM
npr:

Ooooo.
jtotheizzoe:

Genetics of the Beautiful “Glass Gem” Corn
Corn gone viral? You’re looking at an ear of a corn variety called “Glass Gem”, grown by Greg Schoen of Seeds Trust. This is real corn! How does it grow this way?
First you have to understand a few things about corn. Each corn kernel is actually a sort of unique plant. A corn plant’s male parts (the “tassels”) sit at the top of the stalk, and drop pollen downward. Unfertilized ears (the female parts) catch the pollen with the sticky ends of their corn silks. Each corn silk (I hate when that gets in my teeth) grabs a pollen grain, shuttles it allllllll the way down inside the ear, eventually creating one kernel for each pollen-silk-ovum combination. It’s one of the more interesting and inefficient breeding schemes I know of.
If you’ve taken genetics, you know that the parents’ genes will combine by chance, leading to certain ratios of inheritance in the offspring. This is the basis of Mendelian genetics (great Khan Academy video here).
With corn, we’ve simply carefully bred all the interestingness out of them. Native Americans were used to multi-colored corn, because corn plants held many varieties of color genes that could combine at random. Now all we are left with are one-color clones.
This “Glass Gem” corn is the other extreme of the spectrum, a combination of corn color hybrid genes and random pollination. It’s almost too pretty to eat!  
(via Discover Magazine)

npr:

Ooooo.

jtotheizzoe:

Genetics of the Beautiful “Glass Gem” Corn

Corn gone viral? You’re looking at an ear of a corn variety called “Glass Gem”, grown by Greg Schoen of Seeds Trust. This is real cornHow does it grow this way?

First you have to understand a few things about corn. Each corn kernel is actually a sort of unique plant. A corn plant’s male parts (the “tassels”) sit at the top of the stalk, and drop pollen downward. Unfertilized ears (the female parts) catch the pollen with the sticky ends of their corn silks. Each corn silk (I hate when that gets in my teeth) grabs a pollen grain, shuttles it allllllll the way down inside the ear, eventually creating one kernel for each pollen-silk-ovum combination. It’s one of the more interesting and inefficient breeding schemes I know of.

If you’ve taken genetics, you know that the parents’ genes will combine by chance, leading to certain ratios of inheritance in the offspring. This is the basis of Mendelian genetics (great Khan Academy video here).

With corn, we’ve simply carefully bred all the interestingness out of them. Native Americans were used to multi-colored corn, because corn plants held many varieties of color genes that could combine at random. Now all we are left with are one-color clones.

This “Glass Gem” corn is the other extreme of the spectrum, a combination of corn color hybrid genes and random pollination. It’s almost too pretty to eat!  

(via Discover Magazine)

2 years ago via nabokovsnotebook (originally jtotheizzoe)
6 April 2012 @ 12:22 PM
climateadaptation:

Republicans,  “More pesticides, please.”
theatlantic:

The Truth About the Republican War on Caterpillars
In a statement widely taken as a metaphor, the chairman of the Republican National Committee on Thursday said his party is no more trying to hurt the nation’s females than it is larval butterflies and moths.
“If the Democrats said we had a war on caterpillars and every mainstream media outlet talked about the fact that Republicans have a war on caterpillars, then we’d have problems with caterpillars,” Reince Priebus told Bloomberg Television, in response to a question about the party’s supposed “war on women.” “It’s a fiction.”
But the war on caterpillars and other innocent insects, it turns out, is not a fiction at all.
Under the guise of aiding the agriculture industry, Republicans and their allies in Washington have been waging a long-running campaign to prevent the Environmental Protection Agency from limiting bug-killing pesticides. Last year, GOP Sen. Pat Roberts of Kansas authored a letter, signed by several others in his party, calling on Democrats to “address the continued regulatory overreach by the Environmental Protection Agency that is a growing concern of farmers, ranchers, foresters and agribusinesses throughout the nation” by bringing up their bill to ease pesticide regulations. This obvious attempt to run roughshod over the rights of many-legged herbivores everywhere was laughably justified as a matter of “public health as we enter mosquito season.” […]
Republicans may claim that they have no anti-caterpillar agenda — that they’re just trying to protect people and plants from being bitten, that they’re merely the victims of a liberal media that sympathizes with the radical bugs’-rights lobby. But the truth is clear, and it’s nothing new: Republicans just don’t care about caterpillars.
Read more. [Images: Reuters]

climateadaptation:

Republicans,  “More pesticides, please.”

theatlantic:

The Truth About the Republican War on Caterpillars

In a statement widely taken as a metaphor, the chairman of the Republican National Committee on Thursday said his party is no more trying to hurt the nation’s females than it is larval butterflies and moths.

“If the Democrats said we had a war on caterpillars and every mainstream media outlet talked about the fact that Republicans have a war on caterpillars, then we’d have problems with caterpillars,” Reince Priebus told Bloomberg Television, in response to a question about the party’s supposed “war on women.” “It’s a fiction.”

But the war on caterpillars and other innocent insects, it turns out, is not a fiction at all.

Under the guise of aiding the agriculture industry, Republicans and their allies in Washington have been waging a long-running campaign to prevent the Environmental Protection Agency from limiting bug-killing pesticides. Last year, GOP Sen. Pat Roberts of Kansas authored a letter, signed by several others in his party, calling on Democrats to “address the continued regulatory overreach by the Environmental Protection Agency that is a growing concern of farmers, ranchers, foresters and agribusinesses throughout the nation” by bringing up their bill to ease pesticide regulations. This obvious attempt to run roughshod over the rights of many-legged herbivores everywhere was laughably justified as a matter of “public health as we enter mosquito season.” […]

Republicans may claim that they have no anti-caterpillar agenda — that they’re just trying to protect people and plants from being bitten, that they’re merely the victims of a liberal media that sympathizes with the radical bugs’-rights lobby. But the truth is clear, and it’s nothing new: Republicans just don’t care about caterpillars.

Read more. [Images: Reuters]

2 years ago via climateadaptation (originally theatlantic)
16 January 2012 @ 8:09 AM
darkearthchild:

A new movement of green thumbs, The Windowfarm Project, established in 2009. An open source community developing edible gardens in an urban environment, all year round. It’s R&D-I-Y, Research & Develop It Yourself. You don’t need space and a yard to to grow your own food. This is something we all can do!
Website: our.windowfarms.org
Video: Here

darkearthchild:

A new movement of green thumbs, The Windowfarm Project, established in 2009. An open source community developing edible gardens in an urban environment, all year round. It’s R&D-I-YResearch & Develop It Yourself. You don’t need space and a yard to to grow your own food. This is something we all can do!

2 years ago via sixblocksaway (originally darkearthchild)
14 January 2012 @ 4:15 PM
nezua:

daughtersofdilla:

(via Latino Rebels)
 

Whoa, now. That’s a little too true to go viral

nezua:

daughtersofdilla:

(via Latino Rebels)

Whoa, now. That’s a little too true to go viral

(Source: daughtersofdig)

2 years ago via foundorfollowed (originally daughtersofdig)